photo of faculty member teaching a class outside

Preparing Future Faculty

What It Is:

The Preparing Future Faculty Program (PFF) is a national initiative that transforms the way doctoral programs prepare aspiring faculty members for their careers. It emphasizes an education that is informed by the kinds of responsibilities faculty members actually have at a variety of institutions.

While doctoral students receive training in the demands of original research, many are under-prepared for the teaching and service requirements they will face as new faculty members. Evidence shows that, during the tenure process, research productivity may fail to meet expectations due to the time demands of service and course preparation placed on new faculty members. Thus, it is advantageous for doctoral students to gain experience in graduate school balancing research, teaching, and service demands.


Curious? Check out some highlights from recent PFF/PFP presentations to learn more about the types of events commonly hosted as part of our program!

National Preparing Future Faculty Program

The national PFF Program was inaugurated in 1993 as a cooperative effort of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) and the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) with support from The Pew Charitable Trusts. It began with the broad goal of improving graduate and undergraduate education. Seventeen clusters of institutions received financial support from AAC&U and CGS for the purpose of developing specific programs based on the strengths and interests of particular universities.

In phase two of this project, ten of the original institutions and five additional universities (including the University of New Hampshire), received financial support. These programs were chosen to take PFF from a pilot project to a more national and institutionalized approach. In addition to this goal, all of the participating universities are encouraged to share their PFF knowledge with other institutions that would benefit from the enhancement of graduate and undergraduate education.

How to Participate:

1- Cognate in College Teaching

Doctoral students have the opportunity to add the 12-credit Cognate in College Teaching to their graduate degree program. It emphasizes the development of classroom teaching skills in a specific field or discipline. Interested students are encouraged to apply to the Cognate in College Teaching through the Graduate School, and read below for more details:

student and faculty member outside on campus

Additional Details:

Each summer, the UNH Graduate School and the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning co-sponsor the Cognate in College Teaching summer program. This program features both on-campus courses and electronic, asynchronous courses designed to prepare doctoral students for academic teaching positions. Students learn about strategies for teaching and evaluating performance, about the academic environment and about the role of academic citizenship. All courses emphasize the transfer and relationship of theory and research into instructional practice. Scheduled course offerings are available on the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning website.

2- Academic-Year PFF/PFP Events

In addition to this formal academic program, numerous presentations, workshops, and guest lectures are held throughout the academic year that focus on teaching strategies, life in academia, and other topics of interest. Additionally, Preparing Future Professional (PFP) workshops are frequently held to provide opportunities for all graduate students to build their professional development skills. Students do not need to apply to attend these events; simply register using our online form to reserve your seat at our upcoming events.